Software testing vs modern architecture

If you work with distributed version control systems like Git, concept of pull requests should be clearly obvious to you. In simple words: if you want to have some code implemented in project maintained by others, you make yourself a branch, write code and create a pull request that will be merge to this project after code review. In big picture: it’s you who should make changes and the project owners are only doing code reviews.

Continue reading

Protractor Tutorial: Jasmine test logging

Proper test logging is a crucial part of our framework setup. As long as your plan is green then everything is good, but have you ever tried to analyse test failures on CI server with no logs or test traces? Good practice is to log every important step of your tests, so that one could read our logs and understand test logic.

In previous tutorial we went through setting up new Protractor project from scratch. If you run your test, you would noticed that Jasmine’s default test output to console is rather poor. In this post we would configure more verbose and user friendly console logging from our tests.

Continue reading

Protractor Tutorial: example project setup

Web development is easily one of the fastest changing field of software engineering. When comes to web application’s functional testing, there is one king – Selenium Webdriver. It has been in use for about a decade and it’s still greatly popular. With demand for fast and reliable single page app’s development framework, Angular’s become first choice for majority of new web projects. Although Selenium Webdriver is still great tool for testing Angular applications, it falls short in some framework-specific aspects.

Developers and community behind Angular framework quickly realised that and came out with their own implementation of Selenium Webdriver – Protractor, an end-to-end testing framework, written on top of WebdriverJS. Protractor runs test agains your application in browser, simulating real user.

protractor-logo-large

Continue reading

REST-Assured 3.0

I started using REST-Assured framework around version 1.5 and since then it’s my first-choice REST client for test automation projects. Back then it was very straight forward, but still way better than it’s available, verbose equivalents. It’s major pros are ease of use – you basically add one static import and you’re ready to go, and BDD convention, which improves readability a lot. But when you dive deeper into REST-Assured framework, you’ll find many handy features, like object serialization, built-in assertions, response manipulation, etc. I already write two post about REST-Assured (framework overview, and more advanced), which become two most popular articles on my blog. Since then the framework gained a lot of popularity and it’s still being developed.

We have version 3.x now, with some great announcements. If you don’t want to study release notes (which I highly recommend!), take a look at this post, with overview of the major changes and new features.

Continue reading

Code review for Testers

Code reviews are essential for an software engineering process. Popularised with open-source community, they becoming a standard for every development team. When done right, can not only benefit in avoiding bugs and better code quality, but also be instructive for a developer.

Although code reviews and pull requests are well popularised through developers, it’s still kind of an unknown land for testers. In most of the scrum teams I’ve worked with, test engineers weren’t participating in pull-request reviews by default. It’s high time to change testers (and teams!) mindset. In this post I would like to consider code review from test engineer perspective and point it’s benefits, both for testers and scrum teams.

git-pull-request-512

Continue reading

Software Testing Certification

Professional certification is a hot topic. While professions are getting more and more specialised and rivalry is not only on the employee level, but HRs and recruiters also, who’re competing in hiring best professionals, it takes even more to promote yourself and prove your value and knowledge.
On the other hand, professional certification is a business, and while exams are paid, certifications centres takes profit from number of people attending. There’s also no certification trend lately, saying that in professions like software development, certificates don’t prove ones value, because they don’t show experience, ability to learn and wide knowledge.

Continue reading

Microservices testing

Modern software engineering is all about scalability, product delivery time and cross-platform abilities. These are not just fancy terms – since internet boom, smartphones and all this post-pc era in general, software development turns from monolith, centralised systems into multi-platform applications, with necessity of adjust to constantly changing market requirements. Microservices quickly becames new architecture standard, providing implementation independence and short delivery cycles. New architecture style creates also new challenges in testing and quality assurance.

Screen Shot 2016-07-25 at 15.56.18

Continue reading

Public speaking: lessons learned

I’m on the train going home from Gliwice, where Quality Excites conference was held this year. I was giving Testing Microservices Architecture talk here and it was my biggest event so far. Over the past few months I was fulfilling my personal goal, which was to participate in IT events as a speaker. I started as a complete beginner, and despite I still consider myself as one, I manage to gain some experience and learn important lessons.

FullSizeRender

Continue reading

Wiremock stateful behaviour

In distributed systems architecture, testing becomes much more complex than in monolith architecture. Although only end-to-end testing gives us full confidence of system-wide implementations, we should also test services in isolation. The easiest way to obtain isolation in microservices architecture is to stub external applications.

The problem is that mocks are usually stateless – they simulate application logic with fixed actions, without any conditional behaviour. If we want to test cases like HTTP latency or data redundancy validations, where external service represents different behaviour among repeated calls, simple mocks can be insufficient.

Continue reading

How to hire a tester

Being a tester is quite confusing: you write code, but you’re not a Programmer. You perfectly know business requirements, but you’re not a Product Owner. You handle test environments, but you’re not an DevOps. Role of technical testers in modern agile development teams is significantly different, and requires knowledge in many fields: software engineering, programming, test automation, environment management, …etc. Result? Hiring good and experienced testers becomes more and more difficult, since being one often means to be in temporary state before turning into programmer or product owner role. So, how to hire dedicated testers?

howtohiretester

Continue reading